snolla:

"The way I look at it is this. On average, we have maybe 50 to 60 years on the planet. And we probably have 20 years when we’re a vital presence, when you can actually do something with your life. So what are you going to do with that time? Are you gonna enjoy it, not get involved? Or are you gonna try and do something to make some other peoples’ lives better than they are, even if it means going through hell? Even if those people don’t even appreciate what you’re trying to do. Even if you’re not sure yourself that what you’re doing is going to make any bit of difference.

I go through cycles thinking about this. I mean, what do you have to do to remind people that one of the best things you could hear in this life is the laughter of a child? I’m always trying to understand what’s happening in the world … When it comes down to it, you can’t turn your back on what’s happening. You have to do something. Jesus knows, it’s tough, because you never really know if what you’re doing is going to have any effect. But what’s the alternative? You walk away, pretend it’s not happening? Can’t be done.”

- Eddie Vedder on the song “Indifference.”

Reblogged from Eddie Vedder
Because we grew up surrounded by big dramatic story arcs in books and movies, we think our lives are supposed to be filled with huge ups and downs. So people pretend there is drama where there is none.
— Kurt Vonnegut (via perfect)
Reblogged from Insert Song Lyric Here
When you were in high school and college, and you were kind of allying yourself into certain musical genre like I was, my friends were all listening to AC/DC, and then, for whatever reason, I went for The Smiths. And it was a way I defined myself as an individual. I think when you are younger, you get very protective and defensive of your own identity, and you wanna validate your position in the world versus other people, something like that… But as you get older, you grow up and you realize… you just start to find the beauty in so many different things that you kind of maybe turned your nose up at
— Matt Berninger   (via kuzape)
Reblogged from I've lost direction
putonyourbathingsuits:

"I certainly feel a kinship with The National. I adore their music and I adore them personally. I think Matt Berninger is one of my favourite lyricists. His lyrics have a sort of self-effacing, melancholy, black humour thing going on. But are also really poignant, with these images that really resonate, that a lot of people can relate to. That line from the song England is my favourite: Famous angels never come through England."
 - St Vincent

putonyourbathingsuits:

"I certainly feel a kinship with The National. I adore their music and I adore them personally. I think Matt Berninger is one of my favourite lyricists. His lyrics have a sort of self-effacing, melancholy, black humour thing going on. But are also really poignant, with these images that really resonate, that a lot of people can relate to. That line from the song England is my favourite: Famous angels never come through England."

 - St Vincent

I don’t think of it as being a sad song, but it’s a song about someone’s relationship with their own sadness or sorrow and they, they love it, you know. There’s something about it that they’re attached to, and they value it, and need it, and so the song sort of, the ‘I don’t want to get over you’ part is not about a person, it’s about sorrow itself … ‘I don’t want to lose my sorrow.’

Matt Berninger, The National on the song “Sorrow”

Exactly.

(via eggseggseggs)
Reblogged from Stoop Shit Bandit
I sat down and I put on the headphones, and I looked out over Los Angeles and I listened to what he put on it and I just started welling up. My eyes were getting misty, I was crying a little bit, and I’m trying to not cry because the guys are there. Trying to be all manly about it, whatever that means. I was very touched, I didn’t know how to respond to it after I heard it. I was like, this is some of the greatest lyric writing I’ve ever heard, and I’m hearing it for the first time right now and it’s on my song and I’m very honored by that.
— Mike McCready on Sirens- Via AlternativeNation (via lifewasted)
like-rocks—in—-riots:

Love This :)…

like-rocks—in—-riots:

Love This :)…

Reblogged from Like Rocks In Riots
I think that one of these days you’re going to have to find out where you want to go. And then you’ve got to start going there.
— J.D. Salinger, The Catcher in the Rye (via aurelle)
Tags: quote
"And can we thank Matt Cameron for playing in two fucking bands?”- Eddie Vedder
Charlottesville, VA  (via bycrookedcornell)
Reblogged from 我是美雅.
This one is written by our great friend and one of the greatest drummers, Mr. Matt Cameron. We don’t play it that often but it’s uh… oh, Matt ‘Fucking’ Cameron, I forgot his middle name. Matt ‘FUCKING’ Cameron. This number is called ‘Cropduster’
— EV, Worcester 10/16/13 [x] (via yamsyamsyams)
Reblogged from 我是美雅.
I think she’s done some really good work. I don’t know her personally and I hope that she takes care of herself. She has a beautiful daughter and I’d like to see Courtney take care of herself physically. But other than that, I think she’s done really good work. I haven’t seen her live but I saw the Unplugged show (on MTV) and I liked the Live Through This album. Doll Parts is a great song. I thought the Unplugged performance was really great. I think the band is really good and I think it’s important for them to take care of themselves. They’ve already lost one band member, poor girl, and I just think it’s important that for even artists that move toward the edge, you have to maintain some balance or you won’t live. I think life is too great. I hate to see anybody throw their life away, so I hope that a lot of these younger people will try to maintain some balance.
— Patti Smith on Courtney Love (via water-her-rack)
Reblogged from Hopper-for-Lucy
Sometimes you spend a lot of time getting upset with other people and getting aggravated with people, you know. Like, somebody who just doesn’t know how to stand in line or is rude to their neighbours. I mean, you guys seem to be doing really great up front and that says a lot about you as a community. You know, even people that can’t, you know, they just frustrate you - they drive like assholes and threaten the life of you and your kids in the car…And you get so angry at these people, right? But I realise, like, sometimes, maybe they’re just put here to show us what an asshole looks like so we don’t become one ourselves. I mean, it’s just a way to think positive about things. Make good use of a knucklehead, right?
Eddie Vedder (21st June 2012, Manchester)
There are two Eddie Vedders. One is quiet, shy, barely audible when he speaks. Loving and loved in return. The other is tortured, a bitter realist, a man capable of pointing out injustice and waging that war on the home front, inside himself. On a warm and windy late-spring day in San Rafael, California, it’s easy to see which Eddie Vedder is shooting baskets outside the Site, the recording studio where Pearl Jam are finishing their second album. It is tortured Eddie, the one with the deep crease between his eyebrows.
— Cameron Crowe (via igotbugs)
The album’s cover art is a modified Hubble Space Telescope photo of the Hourglass Nebula. Regarding the artwork, Jeff Ament said, “The reason that we went with Tchad [Blake] is because he provides an amazing atmosphere to songs….So, I think we wanted the artwork to represent that….One of the themes that we’ve been exploring…is just realizing that in the big scheme of things, even the music that we make when we come together, no matter how powerful it is, it’s still pretty minuscule. I think for me the whole space theme has a lot to do with scale. You know, you look at some of those pictures, and there are thirteen light years in four inches in that picture.
— Jeff Ament about Binaural (via lifewasted)